Audrey McGlinchy

City Hall Reporter

Credit Martin do Nascimento / KUT
Audrey McGlinchy is the City Hall reporter at KUT, covering the Austin City Council and the policies they discuss. She comes to Texas from Brooklyn, where she tried her hand at publishing, public relations and nannying. Audrey holds English and journalism degrees from Wesleyan University and the City University of New York. She got her start in journalism as an intern at KUT Radio during a summer break from graduate school. While completing her master's degree in New York City, she interned at the New York Times Magazine and Guernica Magazine.

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Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The bureaucratic stars over City Hall may just align in 2019.

Next year, the city will weigh four ambitious plans that aim to achieve the long-sought goal of making Austin more affordable.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

People experiencing homelessness can now work for the City of Austin.

The city's Parks and Recreation Department, along with the Austin Public Health Department, The Other Ones Foundation and Austin City Council Member Ellen Troxclair highlighted the pilot program Monday in southeast Austin.

Celeste Noche for KUT

As Austin grows, it’s getting more difficult for middle-income people to afford the city. But Austin is not alone; cities across the country are facing similar issues. KUT’s Audrey McGlinchy traveled to Seattle, Denver and Portland to find out how each city is dealing with rapid growth – and how they're trying to make sure every resident benefits from it.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Austin’s paid sick leave ordinance is likely not going into effect any time soon – and may never.

A Texas court of appeals ruled Friday that the ordinance, which mandates that most private employees in Austin get six to eight paid sick days a year, violates the state constitution. Specifically, it found, the ordinance is preempted by the Texas Minimum Wage Act.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

Officers with the Austin Police Department are getting a new labor contract.

After nearly a year of negotiations, City Council members unanimously approved a four-year and $44.6 million contract between the city and the local police union. Police reform activists celebrated the contract as a step toward more transparency – including the ability to file complaints online and anonymously.

Kirsten Leah Bitzer for KUT

Austin is growing and it’s getting more difficult for middle-income people to afford the city. But Austin is not alone; cities across the country are facing similar issues. KUT’s Audrey McGlinchy traveled to Seattle, Denver and Portland to find out how each city is dealing with rapid growth – and how each is trying to make sure every resident benefits from it.

Roving-Aye/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Austin is growing and it’s getting more difficult for middle-income people to afford the city. But Austin is not alone; cities across the country are facing similar issues. KUT’s Audrey McGlinchy traveled to Seattle, Portland and Denver to find out how each city is dealing with rapid growth – and how they're trying to make sure every resident benefits from it.

Gabriel C. Pérez

Most mornings, Dave Sullivan bikes from his house in Clarksville to the University of Texas. He then hops on an express bus to his job as a researcher at the J.J. Pickle Research Campus.

During the election season, his daily commute served as a sort of poll of voters – albeit, with a miniscule sample size.

Eddie Gaspar for KUT

Steve Adler won re-election as Austin mayor in a landslide victory Tuesday and will serve another four years in office as voters came out in record numbers in Travis County.

Adler earned 59 percent of the vote and overpowered his biggest challenger, former Austin City Council Member Laura Morrison, and five other candidates.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

It took two years and millions of dollars, but thousands of sexual assault evidence kits collected in Austin and stuck in backlog have finally been tested.

The Austin Police Department confirmed it completed the testing in late September.

Julia Reihs / KUT

Take all the people who live in New York City. Multiply that by two, and you'll get the number of passengers who are expected to travel through Austin's airport this year: 16 million.

IndyAustin screengrab

One of Austin’s more prolific political action committees has apologized after releasing a video ad featuring Pepe the Frog, a cartoon frog used by anti-Semitic and alt-right groups.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

Update: Austin's boil-water notice has been lifted. Find out more here.

Original story:

Austin Water officials say the water utility is on track to end its boil-water notice by Sunday evening at the latest.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

A Californian who attempted a 2016 presidential run. A staffing and finance company with offices in Austin, Dallas, Houston, Seattle and Denver. Men in California and New Jersey. These are some of the funders of political action committees behind two local ballot initiatives – Propositions J and K.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

If you’re tired of hearing about the faceoff between Sen. Ted Cruz and Congressman Beto O’Rourke, maybe it’s time to turn your attention to local elections, like the mayor’s race.

Mayor Steve Adler is fighting to retain his seat against six challengers, most of whom are political newcomers with some wild ideas – including building a dome around Austin to keep out “foreigners and California refugees.” (Uber would pay for it.)

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin voters will be asked to consider a lengthy ballot this November. There’s the showdown between Beto O’Rourke and Ted Cruz, six City Council elections and a list of 11 local propositions.

Let’s skip past Propositions A through I (you can read about them here), and get into Proposition J.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Every Oct. 1, the City of Austin welcomes a new budget – and with it, new city fees. These can be anything from public library fines to what it costs to adopt a dog from the city shelter.

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

The City of Austin will host three community forums over the next week to consider changing how city police officers are supervised.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin City Council approved a $4.1 billion budget for the upcoming fiscal year, with more money going toward homelessness outreach and an increase in the minimum wage for city employees.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Correction: The city filed a brief in response to an injunction temporarily halting its sick pay ordinance. It has not yet appealed.

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The City of Austin said it plans to appeal a state court’s decision to put on hold the city’s paid sick leave ordinance, which was set to go into effect Oct. 1.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Drones are multipurpose: They can deliver pizzas and tally seals. Drones can fight wildfires and make aerial videos that garner pretty impressive watch counts on YouTube.

Drones can also map fatal car crashes, which is why the Austin Police Department recently doled out $10,468 to buy two of them.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Texas Supreme Court has denied petitions from two Austin residents asking that the city rewrite a pair of November ballot measures.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin City Clerk has reversed her decision to challenge Lewis Conway Jr.'s candidacy for Austin City Council.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The Austin-Travis County Sobering Center is a nondescript three-story building on Sabine Street in downtown Austin. Starting Oct. 1, police and EMS will be able to bring intoxicated people in 24 hours a day instead of taking them to a jail cell or a hospital bed.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Lewis Conway Jr., a candidate for Austin City Council who has a felony record, may not be able to run after all.

Austin City Clerk Jannette Goodall sent Conway an email Friday challenging his eligibility and asking for documents that he had been pardoned or "otherwise released from the disabilities" resulting from his conviction.

Julia Reihs / KUT

For the second time in a week, the City of Austin has been sued in the Texas Supreme Court over the wording of a question headed to the November ballot. This time, petitioners are challenging how the city wrote a proposition regarding whether residents should have the power to reject land-use rewrites like the now-defunct CodeNEXT.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

An Austin resident, represented by attorney Bill Aleshire, is suing the city over the wording of a November ballot measure about a citywide audit.

Activists collected more than 30,000 signatures asking the city to hire a third party to conduct an efficiency audit of all its departments. Austin City Council members voted Thursday to put the question to voters.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

“What prevents you from talking about race?”

The trainer offered the group of nearly 90 people seated in a room on the 10th floor of the LBJ Presidential Library some suggestions: Was it fear? Maybe fatigue? Ignorance?

Whatever their reasons, this group of executive directors, educators and local government employees had gathered to do just that: spend two days talking about race.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Census tract 48453002411 has a lot to offer. There’s a brewery on the north edge of the tract. There’s a neighborhood park, and you’re not too far from McKinney Falls State Park. On a good day, you can drive from this part of Southeast Austin to downtown in 20 minutes.

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